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Multilingualism – really? Understanding language policies in South Tyrol

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15 October 2021
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South Tyrol is characterized by its three autochthonous language groups, German, Italian and Ladin, but migrants struggle to navigate the rules of languages implemented in the province. - © Unsplash David Pisnoy

South Tyrol in the north of Italy is characterized by its three autochthonous language groups, German, Italian and Ladin, and is very proud of its mix of languages. Yet, migrants struggle to navigate the rules of languages implemented in the province.

Luana Franco Rocha

Luana Franco Rocha is currently a Postdoctoral fellow at the Center for International Studies of Sciences Po Paris. She holds a doctoral degree in Social Pedagogy from the Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, in Italy, and a master degree in Sociolinguistics from the Universidade Federal Fluminense, in Brazil. She researches the management of diversity, migration studies, language policies and sociolinguistics. In her free time, Luana loves to try cooking new recipes that she has tasted while travelling around the world.

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Citation

https://doi.org/10.57708/b65234945
Franco Rocha , L. Multilingualism – really? Understanding language policies in South Tyrol . https://doi.org/10.57708/B65234945

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